DIY Hanging Succulent Planter or Candle Holder

 
 

I've really let myself indulge in my succulent craze during my funemployment. I've turned my apartment living room into a pseudo flower shop, with all my orchids and succulents lined up against our eastern-facing window sill. (Thanks to my roommates for putting up with this!) I totally see how people turn into avid gardeners as they grow older - if only I had a backyard!

Anyway, while browsing Craigslist (another one of my funemployment hobbies), I found a man selling succulent cuttings and starters for only $1 each, which is really a bargain! Andre had a beautiful succulent garden, and I ended up going home with new project ideas and succulent wisdom, in addition to the 11 succulents I bought from him.

But what to do with them? After finding 2 stemless wine glasses, perfect for little terrariums, at Goodwill for 50 cents, I decided to copy one of Brit + Co's hanging succulent projects, where the terrarium hangs from a homemade net. I'm really pleased with how it turned out - it's really easy, and makes our living room look a little more grown-up!

Things you will need:

- Stemless wine glasses, mason jars, or short drinking glasses
- Thick cotton cord or cotton rope (~50 feet)
- Scissors
- Succulents
- High-drainage potting soil
- Gravel and/or horticultural sand
- Charcoal (optional, but recommended!)

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Instructions:

1. Cut your string into 10 pieces of equal length. I chose about 5 feet in length.

You can actually do fewer or more pieces, as long as you choose an even number. However, I think 10 looks nice, like a flower!

2. Tie your strings in one big knot, leaving a couple inches at the end to dangle.

3. Split the strings into pairs, and tie the two strings of each pair in a knot.

Make sure the knot is tied around the same spot on each pair, so that the net looks even when completed.
For this first row of knots, tie each knot no more than an inch from the big knot.

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4. Take one string from one pair, and one string from the adjacent pair. Knot these two strings together to begin creating the net. 

Repeat for all pairs - knotting strings from adjacent pairs. Make sure you're taking the strings from the pair actually neighboring, otherwise you'll have a tangled web!

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5. Repeat step 4 several more times to make the net bigger.

The number of times you repeat step 4 will depend on how large your glasses are, and how big you want your net to be. To decide, put your glass or jar inside the net after every "row" of the net, so you can see what it would look like.

6. (Optional) If you want two planters on the same hanger, tie all the strings in a large not about 12-18 inches above the top of your first net. Then, repeat steps 3-5 to make another net.

7. Tie all the strings together in one big knot near the end of the strings. 

8. Make your succulent terrariums!

  • Fill your glass or jar an inch or so with gravel to ensure draining. (I didn't have gravel with me at the time, so I filled the bottom with the sand, hopefully it'll do the trick!)
  • If you have charcoal, lay a quick layer down on top of the gravel.
  • Then add a couple of inches (until you reach about halfway on your glass) with your succulent or high-drainage soil. You want enough room for the roots of your succulents.
  • While not necessary, I did a layer of horticultural sand above my soil, both for aesthetic purposes and to make sure my succulents didn't get too wet.
  • Now that you've done all those layers, arrange your succulents as you'd like!

9. To put your terrariums into the hanging nets, it's easiest if you hang your knotted web somewhere. Start with the topmost net (if you have more than one on a single hanger), then work your way down.

All done!

I was thinking these would also be really cool candle votives, using a little tea candle inside each glass instead of filling it with soil and succulents. You would just have to make sure that the flame doesn't extend high enough to potentially burn your cotton rope. You could also do both - candle on top, succulents on bottom. Either way, aren't these absolutely adorable? 

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